International Technological University Located at
2711 N. 1st St., San Jose, CA.
Phone: 888-488-4968
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Digital Arts Course Descriptions

* Please review the student handbook for course prerequisites.

DGA 501 New Media Production (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 905. An introduction to digital media production providing design theory and hands-on experience. The course will cover basic principles of graphic and interface design, which will be applied to the course deliverables, including print, web, mobile, and video productions. Students will also learn about the big picture of project development, including vital skills such as scheduling, budgeting, creating and working within deadlines, and operating in a team-based environment.

DGA 502 Manufacturing Cinematic Space (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 930. As an entry-level design studio course, it uses the familiar language of film to teach volumetric thinking and design principles. The semester is divided into three projects: Analysis (1D), Construction (2D), and Space (3D). (1D) Students begin by analyzing a film through reading, writing, abstracting, and diagramming. (2D) Next, they choose a specific scene within their film to explore in depth through orthographic drawing and traditional architectural representation. (3D) Finally, they use the themes from their film as a catalyst for a design proposal. The final project is modeled physically and digitally, using design software and CAD/CAM/CNC equipment. Students are expected to participate in weekly discussions, presentations, and critiques, and use design software and tools. Some knowledge of the Adobe Creative Suite, CAD, and Rhinoceros, or equivalent, is not expected, but will be beneficial.

DGA 503 Storyboard Design (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 910. Today, Storyboard use is not exclusive to the narrative forms of Film and Animation, but is also widely used in the design of Video Games, Interactive GUI’s, Product Presentations and more. Using stories, designs and flowcharts from actual productions, this course will show students of any drawing skill level an overview of how to effectively design and construct storyboards from thumbnails to presentation layouts.

DGA 504 Global Storytelling (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 820. In a world where the noise of mass and personal communications can overwhelm any message and idea, the role of storytellers who can tell inspiring, persuasive stories and is more important than ever. This course will demonstrate how to apply the universal heroes’ journey in a way that transcends global cultures and civilizations. Students will explore the universal communication tool known as “stories” from its traditional forms such as fairytales, folklore and mythology through today’s digital, augmented transmedia as a means of entertainment, education and communication.

DGA 505 Math and Programming for Artists (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 955. The purpose of this course is to teach practical mathematics and of programming to Digital Arts students. A comprehensive understanding of the mathematics involved in Computer Graphics gives Digital Artists an edge and advantage in their professional productivity. The same must be said for a moderate level of programming capabilities.- The course will proceed with a little math applied to simple level programming – all related to graphics, media and design.

DGA 506 Architectural Tours (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 940. Locus Operandi: methods of urban surveillance. This seminar brings the city to the foreground. Through a series of site visits, the built environment becomes the classroom itself. Students will complete field trips to six locations in San Francisco, and one in San Jose. Each trip will include the following methods of urban surveillance: walking, reading, viewing film, researching, and representing. These activities will be catalogued into a book and a phone application, and will serve as field research for the final project, the design of an urban intervention. Students will be expected to attend all classes, and lead an hour of each visit. Work will be completed using pens, sketchbooks, Adobe Creative Suite, and Rhinoceros, and other related medium.

DGA 507 Design Fundamentals (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 830. This course blends classical visual language fundamentals with project-based design learning applicable to the media and tech industries. Students will learn how to apply core principles of typography, color, and composition to digital products. The emphasis of the course on design methodologies in both theory and practice are instrumental in improving design performance, problem solving skills, and making students into better designers. Course projects will enable students to build a portfolio of digital design solutions across mobile, web, games or film.

DGA 508 CG Software Fundamentals (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 831. This course will provide an overview of the computer graphics process utilized today in print, commercials, games, television and movies. The course will offer the student a hands-on tutorial covering modeling, rendering, lighting, animation and compositing. Students will get to construct a 3D model and take it through all phases of the computer graphic process culminating in a finished scene realistically composited into a 2D background. Other subjects covered include principles of rigging, animation, motion tracking and camera moves with examples provided. Lab fees may apply.

DGA 509 Basic Image Manipulation (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 870. In this modern digital age, the basic principles of photography have not changed. But the tools and techniques of how we arrive at our final image continue to evolve. This class will introduce students to the principles of photography and then explore the tools and aesthetics employed by professionals and amateurs alike to alter or enhance their images. Techniques and skills acquired will then be applied to projects. This class will require a laptop or tablet that can handle the specifications of the software Adobe Photoshop.

DGA 510 Intro to Game Development (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 909. What are the different elements to a game? What makes a great game? Computer game development requires all facets of Computer Science, including Computer Graphics, Artificial Intelligence, Algorithms, Data Structures, Networking, and Human-Computer Interaction. It also requires knowledge of other disciplines including Economics, Mathematics, Physics, and Psychology. The value of this course goes beyond culminating Computer Science. It is largely a hands-on course where real-world skills including design, teamwork, management, documentation, and communications are critical. This course will delve into topics such as the game engine, rendering, user interfaces, sound, animation, and game hacking. This course will also cover designing MMORPGs and mobile games.

DGA 511 General Production Pipelines (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 810. This course covers the general procedures and methodologies to produce a production pipeline from start to finish. Students will be lead through the production process breaking down each phase in a step-by-step fashion and will be introduced to easily applied principles of scheduling each task. Students will learn the principles necessary to breakdown and schedule media projects that can be applied to a wide range of media including; movies, television, advertising, video games, animations, industrial and medical presentations, documentaries and new media.

DGA 512 Web Graphic Design (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 911. This course provides students with instruction in graphic editing software. Projects will use tools, layers and filters to design, edit and create digital images for the Web, apps and digital and interactive media. Topics covered will include: Basic Web design tenets, Using color effectively, Understanding fonts, Designing navigation, Creating graphics that don’t distract from your site, and Using multimedia (sound, animation, and other media) on your site.

DGA 513 Documentary Production (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 800. This course is designed to introduce students to a complete beginning-to-end production process, with the goal of creating a class documentary project. Students will learn every step required to produce and create a finished film, including preproduction planning, camera operation and shooting, lighting, interview techniques, storytelling strategies, editing, motion graphics, and more. An understanding of these tools and procedures are essential for any student who wishes to work in film, or who desires to produce compelling narrative content in a variety of media.

DGA 514 Photographic Principles and Advanced Image Manipulation (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 837. Photography has always been tied to the technology used to create it and that bond is stronger today than it ever has been in the past. This class covers advanced photographic principles of how to get the image you desire by effecting things in the physical world and inside of the camera. Including composition, lighting, the cameras relationship to the image, perspective, and advanced techniques for a wide variety of photography genres. Advanced photography skills will be complemented by curriculum that covers digital image manipulation tools and techniques using Photoshop CC. Image manipulation skills that will be acquired include: photo retouching, color correction and grading, masking and other basic manipulations, compositing, and visual effects. The class assignments will culminate in a professional level final portfolio and presentation to the class. This class requires a laptop computer or tablet running Adobe Photoshop CS6 or CC (a DSLR or mirrorless digital camera with manual setting is strongly suggested).

DGA 515 Sound Design (3 credit hours)

This course provides an introduction to sound design principles for multimedia in a broad and diverse manner. Students will develop skills in recording, digital editing and mixing with industry standard software and techniques.

DGA 516 Production Sound Recording (3 credit hours)

This course is designed to acquaint and introduce students to the basic principles of audio recording and production through classroom lecture, and hands on training, as well as guided and individual studio projects. Students will learn recording techniques, including the choice of microphones and their placement, as well as mixing multi-track audio utilizing equalization, compression, reverb, and panning, with an emphasis on acoustics and the physics of sound. Class projects will focus on recording audio for distribution within, TV, radio, computer gaming, and film. Students will attend lectures and gain experience in production as they complete the projects assigned in the course.

DGA 517 Post Production Sound Recording (3 credit hours)

This course will teach students the specific techniques and strategies used during the audio post-production process. Students will learn how to spot, edit, and assemble dialogue, sound effects, Foley, and music, in addition to mixing and prepping the audio using the industry standard, Pro Tools and other DAW technologies.The course begins with a real-world overview of audio post production, including its evolution, methods, sound crew, and media formats. It then explores techniques and tips for recording location sound, using sound effects libraries, editing production dialogue, and directing and recording a Foley session. Students will learn strategies for working with composers and music supervisors, how to edit songs to fit a scene, and how to record and mix score music. In addition, students will learn how to assemble a pre-dub or temp mix (to group and sub-mix tracks into stems for the final dub), create the final dub, and prepare the mix for foreign distribution and final delivery

DGA 518 UI/UX: User Interfaces & User Experiences (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 920. This course offers students an engaging introduction and hands-on practice in the fundamental areas of humancentered user experience (UX) design. This course will explore design-thinking strategies ranging from behavioral psychology basics to techniques for user research, design ideation, rapid prototyping and usability evaluations. Students will learn how to gather and translate user needs into clear and responsive user interface (UI) solutions. Students will demonstrate their creative problem solving skills by building a design portfolio across a range of UX / UI projects throughout the course.

DGA 519 Still Life & Figure Drawing (3 credit hours)

Digital Art calls on a variety of disciplines beyond proficiency with particular software. There are basic skills and techniques that bring creative ideas to strong, visual presentation. Still-life and Figure drawing are foundations on which most visual expression is built. In a series of sessions using both the Human Figure and Inanimate Objects, learn drawing techniques to capture form, light and shadow, perspective and composition.

DGA 520 Motion Graphics (3 credit hours)

This course will explore the fundamental principles of motion graphics, which blend art and technology to create dynamic visuals for the screen. Students will become familiar with the processes of creating effective animated graphics, suitable for broadcast, films, titles, or commercials. One will learn to create engaging visual imagery, generate unique ideas, and to apply color palettes that support a concept. This course will teach students advanced techniques of motion-graphics creation through the use of software programs utilized by design and animation companies worldwide.

DGA 521 Digital Media Distribution (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 710. The business of media is distribution. It is the art and method of maximizing profits in the delivery and consumption of your work. But the business model and methods of media distribution now change and evolve at ever increasing rates. This course will expose students to industry concepts of networks, life-cycles, ultimates and windows, as well as how those concepts apply to new media such as VOD, apps, tablets, clouds and beyond. Upon completion, students will have an understanding of media business model fundamentals and be prepared to position themselves at the vanguard of the rapidly changing world of digital media distribution.

DGA 522 Editing I (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 823. This course offers students an in-depth understanding of editing principles is one of the core competencies of cinematic storytelling for movies, television, video games, advertising, animation and new media. Logical, intelligent editing is essential for clearly communicating story information and making video greater than the sum of its parts. The theory, practice, history, and techniques of editing will be covered in this comprehensive overview. Students will explore the art and function of editing the moving image for narrative, documentary, and non-traditional web material 130 through an introduction to industry leading non-linear editing systems.

DGA 523 Social Network Marketing & Publishing (3 credit hours)

In the vast sea of opportunities offered by today’s technology and networks, how can you most effectively use social media to achieve your career goals? Many traditional forms of media and networking are simply not enough to reach and captivate today’s media savvy audience. To successfully reach your online and offline audiences you must fully utilize creative, problem-solving, design and communication skills. This class will explore established concepts of personal narrowcasting, blogs and tweets as well as modern takes on subjects such as data visualization and vanity metrics vs. validated learning. Finally, all of these concepts and skills will be applied utilizing affordable and accessible digital publishing tools to deliver the latest apps and media.

DGA 524 Virtual Reality/Augmented Reality (3 credit hours)

Augmented reality, virtual reality, mixed reality… these systems can provide users with astonishingly immersive content and tools. What are the sciences involved in this new technology, and what are the content integration issues involved in building these virtual and augmented environments? This course focuses on the design and evaluation of Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) systems, algorithms, and applications related to the hardware, software, interaction, psychology, technology, and research that are used. Class topics will include systems for presenting information to all five senses (visual, auditory, haptic, olfactory and gustatory), methods for users to interact with objects within virtual environments, and evaluation techniques for assessing effectiveness, as well as vision-based marker and feature tracking, model-to-view space transformations, mobile application development, and interaction techniques. Students will interact with various display and interface devices throughout this course, develop prototype applications, and evaluate them. The format of the course will be a combination of traditional lecture, literature review, and hands-on work. Because the definition and purpose of Virtual and Augmented realities is in flux and evolving rapidly, this course will be colloquium in nature, focused on synthesizing existing literature from multiple related fields and sources, in order to understand and make use of these changes to the mixed reality landscape. Through a combination of traditional lecture, literature review, and hands-on work, students will learn to critically evaluate different alternatives, build prototype systems, and design comparative evaluations to test the effectiveness of various (AR) and (VR) applications. Students will be expected to implement several techniques as part of this course. This course welcomes students with a diverse set of backgrounds, including (but not restricted to): computer science, math, physics, digital art, engineering, and architecture.

DGA 526 Screenwriting (3 credit hours)

Screenwriting is the foundation of cinematic storytelling, and is also a primary tool for animation and video game development. This class will teach students the fundamentals of compelling plots and great drama, the nuances of realistic character development, tips and tricks for writing visually compelling scenes, and how to make your dialog jump off the page. Through story analysis and writing exercises, students will learn to take apart any story to see what makes it work, and will author their own short screenplays all the way from idea to finished script.

DGA 527 Production (3 credit hours)

This course is designed to introduce students to a complete beginning-to- end production process, with the goal of creating a class project. Students will learn every step required to produce and create a finished film, including pre-production planning, camera operation and shooting, lighting, interview techniques, storytelling strategies, editing, motion graphics, and more. An understanding of these tools and procedures are essential for any student who wishes to work in film, or who desires to produce compelling narrative content in a variety of media.

DGA 528 Dynamic UX (3 credit hours)

This course will explore how web technologies are making it easier for websites to become more interactive and behave more like native applications. Students will learn to identify and improve static web designs through the use of dynamic web content, make web pages more interactive without sacrificing usability or accessibility, learn how to deal with touch-screen devices, and learn to give on-screen feedback effectively. This course is intended for UX, UI and Web designers – both beginners and advanced, marketers, and developers.

DGA 529 Introduction to Games Programming Unity, SpriteKit Using C#, and Swift (3 credit hours)

Learn to code in Swift Apple’s new coding language. Learn to make apps in Xcode and learn how to make games with SpriteKit. The course is step by step and project-based, so you will learn programming Swift and C# concepts and apply them immediately to real indie games as you go. • Build an entire game yourself • Step by step in class • Learn Swift and C# • Learn Sprite kit and Unity Requirements: Students must have knowledge of programming in Java, C, C++ or equivalent, course might requires a MAC computer for the Swift and SpriteKit loaded with latest version of Xcode. Previous title “Introduction to Games Programming SpriteKit using C#, and Swift” discontinued in July 2017.

DGA 531 Beginning Augmented Reality (3 credit hours)

Augmented reality, virtual reality, mixed reality… these systems can provide users with astonishingly immersive content. What are the sciences involved in this new technology, and what are the content integration issues to building these virtual places? This course focuses on the design and evaluation of Augmented Reality (AR) systems, algorithms, and applications related to the hardware, software, interaction, psychology, algorithms, technology, and research that are involved. With the proliferation of powerful, always-on, Internet-connected mobile devices such as smart-phones, tablets and newer head-worn displays, sophisticated applications that combine location-specific content with the current user view are becoming more possible. Application developers for these devices require a broad set of technical and design skills to create effective interactive AR experiences. Topics will include vision-based marker and feature tracking, model-toview space transformations, mobile application development, and AR interaction techniques. Through a combination of traditional lecture, literature review, and hands-on work, students will learn to critically evaluate different alternatives, build prototype systems, and design comparative evaluations to test the effectiveness of various AR applications. Students will be expected to implement several techniques as part of this course. This course welcomes students with a diverse set of backgrounds, including (but not restricted to): computer science, math, physics, digital art, engineering, architecture, and psychology.

DGA 532 Beginning Virtual Reality (3 credit hours)

During this course, students will explore the techniques and technologies that need to be brought together to allow Virtual Reality, and other realities along the Mixed Reality Continuum and organic life forms to interact within virtual worlds. Commercial displays, trackers and graphics hardware have enabled many new applications and venues, including: entertainment, training and learning activities, exercise, assessment, rehabilitation and socialization. Class topics include systems for presenting information to all five senses (visual, auditory, haptic, olfactory and gustatory), methods for users to interact with objects within virtual environments, and evaluation techniques for assessing effectiveness. Students will interact with various display and interface devices throughout this course, develop prototype applications, and evaluate them. The format of the course will be a combination of traditional lecture, literature review, and hands-on work. Because the definition and purpose of Virtual Reality is in flux and evolving rapidly, this course will be colloquium in nature, focused on synthesizing existing literature from multiple related fields and sources, in order to understand and make use of these changes to VR.

DGA 604 From Hero to Superhero: The Persistence, Modernization, Global Dissemination (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 749. This course will investigate a key to successful, meaningful storytelling — the heroic archetype, from its origins in classical mythology, to its development in literature, to its importance in today’s international dramatic or comedic properties (including blockbuster film franchises) and advertising via cross-media and transmedia. The course will illustrate the ways such characters provide audience identification, while inspiring empathy and understanding and evoking the emotional spectrum, whether through cinema, TV or portable devices. Students will be given an opportunity to learn about the heroic archetype in its many forms, and create their own heroes, as well as develop narrative properties and model campaigns for global impact and distribution, generating a skill set to make use of this crucial element of storytelling.

DGA 606 Animation I (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 903. Students will develop an understanding of a wide variety of applications used in animation and learn the principles behind 2-D, 3-D, and motion graphics. Through an exploration of 2-D animation concepts, design and techniques, each student will become familiar with animation language and eventually garner the basics used for modeling, positioning and rendering 3-D objects using Autodesk Maya, one of the leading animation software packages for the film and gaming industries.

DGA 607 Storyboards and Layouts (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 921. In this course, students will learn advanced storyboarding and the layout process as it relates to the narrative structure. Emphasis is placed on the full storyboard process from initial sketch (thumbnails) to final, sequential panels. Using supplied stories, design and flow chart examples, students will learn to apply the essentials of drawing to a production, from initial storyboard sequences to final production layouts. Through interactive lectures, discussions, demonstration and studio work, students will be able to translate narrative concepts into effective visual communications for film and video productions, animation, motion graphics, multimedia apps, video games, and theme park attractions.

DGA 608 CG Modeling (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 860. Computer Graphic (CG) 3D modeling involves digitally constructing shapes in a virtual space and is utilized in fields ranging from movies, animation, video games, architecture, medical and industrial visualizations, and a host of new applications and media such as creating virtual actors and Augmented Reality (AR). In this course, students will learn the techniques used by movie and video game industry experts to create professional 3D Models. They will use industry techniques and applications to create new worlds by designing and modeling their own objects, creatures, and environments. This class requires a laptop computer or tablet running Adobe CC Photoshop.

DGA 609 3D Modeling and 3D Printing (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 923. This course instructs students in the best industry standard practices and production pipelines for creating 3D assets using Autodesk Maya, one of the leading software packages for the film and gaming industries. Students will explore the tools and techniques needed to model a wide array of characters, objects, architectures, and environments. Students will build a strong understanding of the methods and principles of 3D modeling. Aspects of the production pipeline will be covered, but the main focus will be from concept design to final sculpture. In addition to learning the basics of 3D modeling with Maya, we will be learning some basics of 3D printers, such as MakerBot Replicator 2. Students will learn the differences between printing materials, techniques to have more predictable results, limitations of current 3D printers and even will be able to print out some objects by the end of the class session!

DGA 610 Rigging for 3D Animation (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 931. This course introduces the basic techniques of character set-up and rigging as used in 3D animation. This course will cover such principles and skills as how to set up a skeleton for an animated character, joint hierarchies, forward kinematics, inverse kinematics, constraints, and how to create facial rigs and blendshapes for facial animation.

DGA 611 Lighting and Compositing (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 950. This course covers the art and science of lighting, shading, and compositing to create computer graphics images (CGI). The lighting and shading portion of the course investigates the look, shading, and atmosphere techniques that brings characters and scenes to life. The compositing portion of the course focuses on the integration of CGI elements with live action footage. The course begins with introduction to the history of photographic lighting and compositing and ends with students learning to create and integrate their own CGI elements through both individual and team based projects.

DGA 612 Concept Art and Storyboarding (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 988. A critical phase for cinema pre-production is in design, planning and storyboarding. Stories unfold through concept designs that include characters, props, wardrobe, locations, sets, color palettes, and environments. No matter what the size of their cinematic project, this course will get students ready for production and a unique integrated approach to quick, realistic and aesthetic designs relevant to their story and characters. Students will learn to generate pre-production material from concept illustrations and character designs to color studies, storyboards and wardrobe designs.

DGA 613 Real-Time Lighting & Compositing (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 830. Learn the techniques film professionals use to paint with lights to create Hollywood caliber scenes and shots. Also take a leap beyond traditional time-consuming renders and learn how to apply the latest real-time technology to light virtual cinematic scenes. This course also shows students how to composite rendered elements, live actors and FX all together using the latest real-time technology.

DGA 614 REAL-Real-Time Lighting & Real-Time Compositing & FX Workshop (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 888. Learn the techniques film professionals use to paint with lights to create Hollywood caliber scenes and shots. Also take a leap beyond traditional time-consuming renders and learn how to apply the latest real-time technology to light virtual cinematic scenes. This course also shows students how to composite rendered elements, live actors and FX all together using the latest real-time technology. Even students with little to no 3D lighting or compositing experience will walk away from this workshop with a complete real-time rendered scene.

DGA 615 ZBrush (3 credit hours)

ZBrush is a very powerful 3D sculpting and texturing tool. The course covers the most popular tools and techniques for digital painting and sculpting in ZBrush, and explains how to export the models and texture maps to other programs for use in games, film, fine art, or 3D printing. The course also highlights the new features in ZBrush 4, such as ShadowBox, clip brushes, and LightBox. Exercise files are included with the course. Topics include: navigating the canvas, using perspective and floor, creating a mesh with a ZSketch, extracting from an existing mesh, managing subdivision levels, working with alphas, masking off parts of a model, using deformation, using subtools, deforming with Transpose, painting and texturing, and creating UV maps. Software used: ZBrush and/or Photoshop.

DGA 616 Android Wear (3 credit hours)

With the natural progression of technology toward wearable devices, Android Wear will only gain in popularity.This class will help the student be prepared and well versed in the design fundamentals, UI/UX flow, how to use notifications, limitations of the platform, and how to help enhance the user with contextual information. Software used: Eclipse.

DGA 617 Motion Capture (3 credit hours)

Motion capture, often called mocap, is the process of digitizing a performance from an actor or animal. It is commonly used for reference or a method to get animation data quickly. This course will cover topics such as: skeletal rigs, animation retargeting, data cleanup, and on set preparation. Software used: Maya and or Motion Builder.

DGA 621 Producing Digital Media (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 720. The skills necessary to produce today’s media are more demanding than ever. Whether it is movies, games, motion graphics, interactive apps and other new media, this class will help students apply universal business production processes essential to take a media project from concept to completion. Topics covered in this course include concept and story development, pre-visualization, bidding, budgeting, financing, scheduling, talent and asset management, and distribution. This course will incorporate the application of these principles to group and individual projects.

DGA 622 Editing II (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 824. The techniques learned in Editing 1 are now applied to the creation of short videos. Students will write and plan short narratives, shoot these projects with basic video cameras, then assemble their work using editing software. The class will cover the technical foundations of nonlinear editing and its software, and provide an introduction to image adjustment tools such as digital mattes, color correction, time remapping (slow and fast motion), title generators, and motion graphics. Video compression and codecs will also be covered.

DGA 626 Animation II (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 916. Using principles introduced in DGA 626 Animation 1, this class offers more advanced and detailed explorations into animation concepts, techniques and processes including acting, gesture, storytelling, 2-D and 3-D forms, software proficiency and project management from concept through to completion of an animated project. This will lead to final projects where students will work individually and with others to complete an animated project which be included in one’s student showreel.

DGA 631 Digital Media Startup (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 900. The state of innovation sets the tone, direction and growth of jobs and entire new industries. The heart of new and innovative ideas is the modern start-up. Master the creative, technical and business skills required to conceive and create one’s own disruptive idea, then launch it into a new start-up. This is project-driven and can be a companion class to the Digital Arts Master Project where students conceive and produce a project from their own original ideas and designs.

DGA 661 Unity 2D/3D Game Development Platform (3 credit hours)

Many of today’s games were created using a game engine, such as Crytek, Unreal Engine, Unity or even a proprietary one written in house. These game engines provide many built in functionalities that aid in the game making process. This course will teach you how to make games from your own assets (3D models, textures, and character rigs). Student will also be writing their own C# scripts. Software: Maya, Photoshop and Unity.

DGA 688 Special Topics (1-3 credit hours)

Special topics courses cover subjects not currently contained in the curriculum, but are designed to address especially relevant trends or developments related to the discipline.

DGA 689 Independent Study (1-3 credit hours)

Independent Study allows students to explore academic areas of special interest not provided in the existing curriculum. It is carried out under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

DGA 690 Master’s Project (3 credit hours)

Previously MMM 999. This is a capstone project culminating in applying and demonstrating the knowledge base and skillets acquired throughout the MSDA program and meeting all departmental Program Learning Outcomes. One is eligible for Master’s Projects only within the final two semesters prior to graduation. One will need to get approval and work closely with a faculty advisor to map out a study plan and create Student Learning Outcomes for a Master’s Project before enrolling in this capstone program.

DGA 692 Master’s Thesis (3 credit hours)

The master’s thesis must be arranged with the master’s thesis advisor. After the topic is approved independent research in Digital Arts toward the MS degree must be conducted. The research must result in some new insights into the academic or practical concepts of the Digital Arts world. These must be analyzed, explained, and documented in the thesis. After completing the thesis the student must defend it before a committee of faculty appointed by the department chair.

Last modified: November 2, 2017